The Crazy Musketeer
Yes but what about the second title?

I like how the recommended blogs on the right column of the dashboard are always blogs about Markiplier (or randomly Toboscus), The Lord of the Rings and Pink Floyd. I sometimes (rarely) find food or drawings.
That might say something about my interests maybe?

posted 6 months ago + 1 note

Gonna make my lunch for tomorrow @__@

posted 6 months ago

I’m quite sure these two are somehow related

I’m quite sure these two are somehow related

posted 10 months ago

I suddenly want bacon..

posted 11 months ago + 1 note

posted 1 year ago + 717 notes — via utabay, © downinthepits

Cute animal doughnuts in Kyoto - Bears, cats owls and pig… oh, my!

bentoandco:

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Kyoto is a pretty cool place for so many reasons. A new one is animal doughnuts! Just down the street from our offices, a new shop opened up. The doughnuts are cute and the ingredients are great. So much more creative and flavorful than other doughnuts I have had. 

Not much to say here because the photos say it all. If you come to Kyoto, stop by our shop and check out these doughnuts while you are here (^-^)

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posted 1 year ago + 19 notes — via bentoandco

Icelandic traditional food “Skyr” with blueberries and cream by Sesselja María on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Taken 1 November 2007
Photo nr. 310 in Photo a day
Text from Wikipedia.org:
Skyr is an Icelandic cultured dairy product, a type of fresh cheese that has been strained, not unlike Greek yoghurt. It is said to have originally come from Norway, brought to Iceland by the Norwegian Vikings, but is currently unique to Icelandic cuisine.
Traditionally, skyr is made with pasteurized skimmed milk and live active cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Then, “skyr condenser” — good skyr, used to ignite bacteria growth, and rennet was added, and the milk was left to coagulate. The skyr was then strained through fabric to remove the whey, called “mysa” in Icelandic, a by-product that Icelanders used as a thirst-quenching drink. Today it is made from non-fat milk.
Skyr, in its traditional preparation, has no added flavors beyond the ingredients mentioned above. Recently, Icelandic manufacturers of skyr have added flavors such as vanilla, berry, and other flavorings common to yoghurt to the final product, to increase its appeal. Skyr-based smoothies have become very popular.
Skyr is a very popular health product in Iceland and was recently introduced to the US in select Mid-Atlantic and New England gourmet stores. Varying slightly between brands, unflavored skyr is roughly 12% protein, 3% carbohydrate, and 0.5% fat. It is high in calcium.
Skyr may be used in a traditional Icelandic dish called hræringur (meaning “stirred” or “made by stirring”) which consists of roughly equal amounts of skyr and porridge. It is often mixed with jam or fruit for a dessert, or with cereals for breakfast. Children often like brown sugar sprinkled on top. It will keep without refrigeration, making it a good high-protein food to take with you on a trip.

Icelandic traditional food “Skyr” with blueberries and cream by Sesselja María on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Taken 1 November 2007

Photo nr. 310 in Photo a day

Text from Wikipedia.org:
Skyr is an Icelandic cultured dairy product, a type of fresh cheese that has been strained, not unlike Greek yoghurt. It is said to have originally come from Norway, brought to Iceland by the Norwegian Vikings, but is currently unique to Icelandic cuisine.

Traditionally, skyr is made with pasteurized skimmed milk and live active cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Then, “skyr condenser” — good skyr, used to ignite bacteria growth, and rennet was added, and the milk was left to coagulate. The skyr was then strained through fabric to remove the whey, called “mysa” in Icelandic, a by-product that Icelanders used as a thirst-quenching drink. Today it is made from non-fat milk.

Skyr, in its traditional preparation, has no added flavors beyond the ingredients mentioned above. Recently, Icelandic manufacturers of skyr have added flavors such as vanilla, berry, and other flavorings common to yoghurt to the final product, to increase its appeal. Skyr-based smoothies have become very popular.

Skyr is a very popular health product in Iceland and was recently introduced to the US in select Mid-Atlantic and New England gourmet stores. Varying slightly between brands, unflavored skyr is roughly 12% protein, 3% carbohydrate, and 0.5% fat. It is high in calcium.

Skyr may be used in a traditional Icelandic dish called hræringur (meaning “stirred” or “made by stirring”) which consists of roughly equal amounts of skyr and porridge. It is often mixed with jam or fruit for a dessert, or with cereals for breakfast. Children often like brown sugar sprinkled on top. It will keep without refrigeration, making it a good high-protein food to take with you on a trip.

posted 1 year ago