The Crazy Musketeer
Yes but what about the second title?
I had four cats at one point. by AnnaTheRed on Flickr.

I had four cats at one point. by AnnaTheRed on Flickr.

posted 2 weeks ago + 2 notes

penabranca:

©Penabranca

penabranca:

©Penabranca

posted 6 months ago + 2,072 notes — via penabranca

Angel Food Cake with Strawberry, Blueberry, and Orange Sauce by jkpa on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
I’m trying to work on my food a little more now. There’s so much to learn, food preparation wise. Each shot I take now I am unhappy with nearly as soon as I take them. Hopefully I can slow down and begin to experiment more soon.

Angel Food Cake with Strawberry, Blueberry, and Orange Sauce by jkpa on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
I’m trying to work on my food a little more now. There’s so much to learn, food preparation wise. Each shot I take now I am unhappy with nearly as soon as I take them. Hopefully I can slow down and begin to experiment more soon.

posted 11 months ago + 3 notes

dreamboatqueeen:

So, ehm, according to the book, Syd’s floorboards are actually PURPLE and orange. Not blue and orange.

My whole life is a lie

!!!!!

posted 1 year ago + 2 notes — via dreamboatqueeen

An old work of mine

An old work of mine

posted 1 year ago

Hoodoo Voodoo by Ben  H. on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Hoodoo, also known as conjure, is a form of predominantly African-American traditional folk magic that developed from the syncretism of a number of separate cultures and magical traditions – at least according to Wikipedia.  And I always thought a hoodoo was just a pile of dirt with a rock on top.  One of the world’s largest populations of hoodoos is found in Northern New Mexico, in the Bisti Badlands, conveniently located exactly 47.2 miles from nothing.  These particular hoodoos were captured just moments before the sun dipped below the horizon, against an unusually cloud-filled sky.  Returning to the trailhead involved a lengthy hike in the dark through a labyrinth of geological apparitions undoubtedly created by the magical process from which their names are derived.

Hoodoo Voodoo by Ben H. on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Hoodoo, also known as conjure, is a form of predominantly African-American traditional folk magic that developed from the syncretism of a number of separate cultures and magical traditions – at least according to Wikipedia. And I always thought a hoodoo was just a pile of dirt with a rock on top. One of the world’s largest populations of hoodoos is found in Northern New Mexico, in the Bisti Badlands, conveniently located exactly 47.2 miles from nothing. These particular hoodoos were captured just moments before the sun dipped below the horizon, against an unusually cloud-filled sky. Returning to the trailhead involved a lengthy hike in the dark through a labyrinth of geological apparitions undoubtedly created by the magical process from which their names are derived.

posted 1 year ago

Dragon by TGKW on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
In accordance with what seems to be becoming a tradition for me, I spent my first night in Singapore wandering the streets alone, stopping only for food, beer and cigarettes. I didn’t have to go far from my hotel before my attention was arrested, first by the sounds of percussion. At a nearby food court - the kind with character: cracked tiles, fluorescent lights, brightly coloured plastic chairs and smoking, loudmouthed locals; not pristine tables, polished glass and wealthy tourists - a troupe of young men was performing a dragon dance. With each clash of cymbals and each bang of the drums, I felt the stresses of air travel being beaten away and my senses opening, to be filled with music, colours and the smell of durian. I remembered the first night I ever spent in this city, and felt glad to be back.
Singapore, 2012.About Me | My Best Work | FAQ | Twitter | Facebook

Dragon by TGKW on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
In accordance with what seems to be becoming a tradition for me, I spent my first night in Singapore wandering the streets alone, stopping only for food, beer and cigarettes. I didn’t have to go far from my hotel before my attention was arrested, first by the sounds of percussion. At a nearby food court - the kind with character: cracked tiles, fluorescent lights, brightly coloured plastic chairs and smoking, loudmouthed locals; not pristine tables, polished glass and wealthy tourists - a troupe of young men was performing a dragon dance. With each clash of cymbals and each bang of the drums, I felt the stresses of air travel being beaten away and my senses opening, to be filled with music, colours and the smell of durian. I remembered the first night I ever spent in this city, and felt glad to be back.

Singapore, 2012.

About Me | My Best Work | FAQ | Twitter | Facebook

posted 1 year ago